• Who Was the Cross For?
  • Constantine the Great: Christian or Pagan? (Paper)
  • Melchizedek, a Type of Christ
  • The Age of Accountability
  • Principles of Conversion: Ownership Brings Activation
  • The Angry God of the Old Testament
  • Why the Death of Jesus?
  • In the Dust of the Rabbi

     

Archives For Theology

Who was the cross for? It was for mankind. But it was also for God himself.

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Open Theism argues that God does not know the future, but learns as he experiences the unfolding of events. But does the Bible support the argument that God does not have foreknowledge? Come explore the different facets of Open Theism and compare it to what the Bible says about God’s foreknowledge.

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Perhaps there is no biblical figure more mysterious than Melchizedek. Mentioned less than a handful of times in the Bible, Melchizedek has fascinated Bible readers for centuries. Who is he, exactly, and why is he so significant? How does he foreshadow Jesus’ ministry, a “typology” of Christ?

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A popular statistic says nearly 85 percent of people who make a decision for Christ do so between the ages of 4 and 14. But how young is too young? And is there an age that is right for a child to become a Christian? When does a child reach the age of accountability where, in God’s eyes, he needs a savior?

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Is the God of the Old Testament unjust, immoral, bloodthirsty, too strict, or just downright mean? Or is there something else at play that answers why we sometimes struggle with seeing him this way?

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Why the Death of Jesus?

October 29, 2012 — 1 Comment

Why the death of Jesus? Was it simply the greatest mistake in all of human history, or was something else going on? Did Jesus really have to die? Couldn’t God have found another way? What does Jesus’ death reveal about our great God and our relationship to him?

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I hope you will enjoy this paper on “An Exegesis of 1 John 1:5-10.” Decoding the theology-speak, the word “exegesis” simply refers to trying to understand the original, intended meaning of a written text. My goal therefore is to look at and understand this critical passage of Scripture in light of its first century context. Why was it written, and to whom? With this we can understand what John originally meant when he wrote it, and also how it applies to us today. Also, 1 John 1:9 is of some controversy as it deals with confession of sin: does it refer to the Christian’s need to acknowledge having sin in general, or is it a decree for the Christian to confess everyday sins as they occur in order to stay forgiven?

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